Getting Sick: A Step In The Right Direction

Getting Sick: A Step In The Right Direction Why You Don’t Want To Suppress Your Next Cold or Flu? It’s likely that you’ll get a cold or flu this year at some point. How you choose to deal with it may actually be more important for your long-term health than you realize. As a Naturopathic Doctor, I think about these acute illnesses a little differently than you’re used to and I find it’s helpful for my patients to understand my thought process. Hopefully this will help you take a new perspective on this year’s cold or flu. The body is smart. This is the principle from which I operate. When we get acutely ill, often this is the body’s attempt to get rid of something harmful. The mucous produced in a respiratory infection helps to clear out infectious organisms (if we let it). When we have food poisoning, diarrhea helps to clear out the organism. When we sweat during a fever, we decrease our inflammation. Getting an occasional acute illness and then clearing it in a short period of time tells us that the immune system is capable of responding and is doing its job. When I have patients who do not get acutely ill at all for several years, I begin to be concerned that they may not be releasing things from their body and may be building up inflammatory toxins, which can lead to more chronic illness. I also wonder if the immune system is working effectively in these patients, which you need it to do in order to prevent long term issues like cancer. Don’t get...
GRATEFULNESS: GIVING THANKS FOR THE SMALL THINGS

GRATEFULNESS: GIVING THANKS FOR THE SMALL THINGS

Stress: At the Heart of Health Issues Stress leads to changes in cortisol and adrenaline levels. We often hear how cortisol goes high, but it could also go too low. Same with adrenaline. When that happens a ripple effect occurs, disrupting hormones throughout your body (such as thyroid, insulin, estrogen, progesterone, leptin, and more), disrupting your digestion, immune system, and nervous system. By the time stress hits all of these areas it can be like a tsunami, spinning you into a blur of fatigue, pain, and turmoil. By then, your heart hurts both emotionally and physically, because the inflammation, oxidative stress, and nutrient deficiencies that have resulted from that stress prevent it from functioning well. How Gratefulness Counteracts Stress Gratefulness – or giving thanks for the positive aspects of life – on the other hand, has been shown to improve all of the stress symptoms I mentioned at the start of this article: Mood, sleep, energy, focus, digestion, and immunity. A 2015 STUDY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA found that women and men with heart failure who kept a gratitude journal for eight weeks had improved heart rate variability (a good thing) and a reduced risk of heart attacks and heart failure. Other studies have found that the stress hormone cortisol is 23% lower in people who practice gratitude, and the calming part of their nervous system (the parasympathetic) is stronger. Within two weeks of daily gratitude, levels of oxytocin – the bonding hormone – were higher (also a good thing), blood pressure shifted to healthier levels, and both mood and sleep improved. Mental clarity increased while inflammation decreased....

Breast Thermography Part II: Common Questions

1) Does thermography use radiation or compress my breasts? No, breast thermography uses infrared cameras to take pictures of the temperature of your skin. 2) Is it safe? Yes, very safe! Breast thermography has been researched since the 1970’s and has over 800 peer-reviewed studies with over 300,000 women to back it up. 3) What will a scan tell me? If you have areas of concern on your pictures, you will be referred for additional diagnostic work-up such as a mammogram. Thermography has been shown to find cancerous or pre-cancerous cell growth up to 10 years earlier than would be otherwise detected because it detects abnormal blood vessel growth and hormone changes. 4) How often should I get scanned? Women should start early for a baseline reading. Many studies recommend having your first scan between 20 and 30 years old. If there is area of concern, you may need to return for additional scans every 6 months. 5) Will insurance cover this? In some states, insurance will cover part of the fee. Most infrared scans range from $250-500. ****At Summit Holistic Medicine Dr. Trojano Offers A Reduced Cost Thermography Day Once A Quarter With Scans Costing $180.00**** 6) Can I still have this done if I am pregnant or nursing? Yes you can. 7) Will the infrared scan diagnose breast cancer? No. Just like a mammogram and ultrasound, infrared is a screening tool used to determine the health of your breast tissue. If there is an area of concern, you will still be referred for additional work-up such as a mammogram. 8) What if the infrared scan shows something...

Breast Thermography: Another Approach to Healthy Breasts

As women, we are well aware of mammograms and ultrasounds. We know to do self-breast exams every month and routine screenings begin at age 40, sometimes earlier depending on family or personal history. We know to feel for lumps, bumps, pain, skin changes, and generally anything that is out of the ordinary for our breast tissue when doing our own exams. What about including Breast Thermography? This imaging uses a digital infrared camera to see the metabolic and circulatory activity within your breasts by relying on surface temperature. The pictures produced are color coded in that a “hot” or very active site is bright red, while a “cool” site is blue/green. Cancerous lesions require its own blood supply and nutrients to grow; therefore it promotes angiogenesis which is the growth of new blood vessels from old blood vessels just re-routed. This swarm of new blood vessels carries a degree of heat to them that show up on the breast thermography as red areas. Because angiogenesis happens early, very tiny cancerous spots or pre-cancerous conditions may be detected much sooner. Breast Thermography does not use radiation nor does it require compression or direct contact with the breasts. It has been approved by the FDA since 1983 for the adjunct screening of breast cancer. Thermography does not look at anatomy or structure like a mammogram. It will not find an actual mass or lump but it will detect changes in breast temperature as related to angiogenesis and/or hormone shifts to the tissue. If you are considering a breast thermogram, remember it should be used in conjunction with a...